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Top 10 Books That Will Change The Way You See Life

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Books have a tremendous amount of strength. They have the power to draw us in, take us on adventures, and change our minds. They have the ability to teach us, move us, provide us with new insights, and help us shape ourselves. The most important ones, on the other hand, have the ability to change our lives forever.

Wuthering Heights, by Emily Brontë

Wuthering Heights, by Emily Brontë

Wuthering Heights Emily Brontë

One might wonder how Emily Bront, a recluse, could have written such a magnificent novel as ‘Wuthering Heights.’ Despite receiving more criticism than acclaim during its first year of publication, the novel went on to become one of the most influential novels in the philosophy of emancipation from the Victorian period’s tacit manacles. In certain ways, Emily Bronte’s novel Wuthering Heights promotes the idea that readers should interpret the novel however they like, and therefore shape their own opinions and assumptions about it. It is not restrained, shackled, or fixed in any way. It isn’t centered on a particular Victorian genre or style, nor is it focused on a specific structure that would have been considered appropriate.

The Lord of the Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien

The Lord of the Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien

The Lord of the Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King is the third and final volume by J. R. R. Tolkien. After the events of The Two Towers, the narrative begins. This is, in my opinion, the best of the three books. After all of the trials and tribulations, everything comes together, and good triumphs over bad. This book is effective on a variety of levels. Alan Lee’s exquisite drawings carry the story to life.

Nineteen Eighty-Four, by George Orwell

Nineteen Eighty-Four, by George Orwell

Nineteen Eighty-Four, by George Orwell

What I find most fascinating about this book is how, even though it was published in 1949, Orwell has deftly designed it to have chilling relevance to our times, when governments all over the world are pushing the envelope on authoritarianism. This is Orwell’s ninth and final novel, and it deals with the ramifications of government overreach, totalitarianism, mass surveillance, and the suppression of individual thinking and behavior in society. Despite not coming close to classic horror, it felt more chilling to me than a Stephen King or a Kafka. Don’t expect the protagonist to play hero, and don’t be alarmed if things seem bleak at times; you, too, will fall in line and assume a meek submission pose. That is the omnipotence of unregulated authoritarianism’s dark truth.

Rebecca, by Daphne du Maurier

Rebecca, by Daphne du Maurier

Rebecca, by Daphne du Maurier

Rebecca’s popularity piqued my interest, and I adore gothic classics. This edition is particularly lovely and mysterious, and the delivery was prompt, and the book was in excellent condition. The story is told through the eyes of a young woman who marries and moves into her husband’s mansion. The narrator describes the events as they unfold, including the mysteries of the mansion, her isolation, and her perpetual existence in the shadow of one person, Rebecca, who is no longer alive. The story has a gothic and atmospheric tone to it. Rebecca’s mystery is very engrossing. The narrative and mystery build-up are the best parts.

To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

Some books are designated as classics and must-reads, and you can wonder what makes a book a classic. And you can only find out the answer if you read the book. This is one of those novels. Even though this book had been on my kindle for 5 months, I had not read it because I assumed the language would be difficult. The story depicts many facets of life in Alabama in the mid-1930s through the eyes of Scout, or Jean Louise Finch, as she is known by her real name. The origin of the nickname is never revealed. Scout is six years old at the start of the novel, two years younger than Harper Lee would have been at the time.

The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The greatest American fiction writer and author of the epic masterpiece novel of all time. The book contains classic fantasy, romance, and a little bit of everything you’d like in a great book for a relaxing read. The protagonist, a graduate who served in the war from the west and worked as a novel’s narrator, and a great mysterious character, Gatsby, are at the center of the plot. Gatsby is brief and easy to read, and I have little doubt that these qualities contribute to the novel’s enduring success. At the same time, it should never belittle its profoundly admirable ability to dissect some of the American culture’s most perplexing values: money, beauty, youth, hard work, and, of course, love.

Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen

At first, I struggled to read this. After the first few pages, there were so many new words in my limited vocabulary that it was difficult not to note how much I needed the dictionary. When explaining the feelings of the characters, the author obviously has a word for it and is very poetic at times. Jane Austen, as anyone who has read her works knows, focused on the lives of families in England during the gentry era, when rich landlords and barons ruled the land. In this novel, she paints a vivid image of what was expected of a fiancé at the time, demonstrating how necessary family, social ties, and wealth were for a marriage partner to be considered proper. The plot revolves around a girl from a family of five sisters who belonged to what would be considered today’s middle class. It follows her feelings for a rich young man as they shift from hatred to admiration. The tale also shows how racism can influence one’s viewpoint and how pride can blind one’s judgment.

Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott

Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott

Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott

Louisa May Alcott’s best-known work, Little Women, is filled with endearing characters and heartbreaking plots. We learn about the lives of four March sisters, Margaret (Meg), Josephine (Jo), Elizabeth (Beth), and Amy, who live with their wise mother while their father is away at war in this novel. – of them faces various moral challenges as they grow up, but they resolve them by learning important life lessons. Even though the four sisters were somewhat different from one another, they had a close bond. It’s a classic for a reason, as it’s full of values and life lessons. Give this book a chance. It will have a special place in our hearts for the rest of our lives.

Animal Farm, by George Orwell

Animal Farm, by George Orwell

Animal Farm, by George Orwell

George Orwell’s Animal Farm is a masterpiece. In this, he employs his incredible creativity and prowess, as well as his wit, to illuminate the tragedy of modern history. The novel is about animals revolting against humans, which ultimately merges into one, making it impossible to distinguish between them. The book is a satire on human hegemony, which is followed by pig hegemony. This is a short book with a lot of intellectual food for your brain to eat! The book can also be read in a broad sense by comparing it to the actions of most people in positions of authority, who take advantage of others and exploit events to their benefit.

The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini

The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini

The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini

The Kite Runner is a tale about Amir’s attempts at redemption. His long-lost relationship with Hassan, his childhood best friend, leads him back to Afghanistan to make amends for the wrongs he committed as a child. The narrator paints a serene picture of Afghanistan before Taliban rule, and it is tragic to see how it is lost afterward. With its moving tale of life as a journey, the friendship between the two kids Hassan and Amir, and other beautifully portrayed characters, there is no doubt that this book will affect you deeply. When you read it in the last chapter, comparing it to when you first read it, the line “For you, a thousand times over” has a significant meaning and will undoubtedly melt you.

 

Hi, I'm Dhiviya, I'm a content writer and a blogger. I've been writing for the past two years, I write about various topics such as life, crime, health, fitness etc. I believe writing is a journey, we are all constantly learning and getting better every day. I'm more active on quora so you can ping me anytime there, it would be a pleasure to reply to you https://www.quora.com/profile/Dhiviya-B

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