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Top 10 Places To Visit In Egypt

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Egypt has everything a tourist might like, from historical and archaeological wonders to legendary and magnificent cities like Cairo, Luxor, Aswan, and Sinia, as well as heavenly natural tropical attractions like Hurghada, El Gouna, Marsa Alam, and Sherm El Sheik on the Red Sea. The ancient Egyptian Civilization’s attractions are the perfect bridge to cross time and space, allowing you to discover all the secrets of ancient Egyptian history.

Egyptian Antiquities Museum

Egyptian Antiquities Museum

Egyptian Antiquities Museum

The Egyptian Antiquities Museum, also known as the Cairo Museum and the Egyptian Museum, is located in downtown Cairo. This magnificent museum houses many interesting and unusual artefacts dating back to the prehistoric period, giving visitors a glimpse into Egypt’s golden era, when the country was ruled by kings. The Egyptian Antiquities Museum, which houses over 120,000 ancient artefacts, is one of the most popular Egyptian destinations for history buffs.

Siwa Oasis at Libyan Border

Siwa Oasis at Libyan Border

Siwa Oasis at Libyan Border

Siwa Oasis is one of Egypt’s most serene places to visit, located in the western part of the country, well away from the city’s hustle and bustle. This quaint little oasis, surrounded by tall date palms and many picturesque water sources, is one of the most scenic tourist destinations in the Western Desert. The ruins of a majestic mud-brick fortification surround this spot. Siwa Oasis is a great place to start planning your adventure tours in the vast desert surrounding it.

Sakkara Pyramids

Sakkara Pyramids

Sakkara Pyramids

You’ve already heard of the Giza Pyramids, but you’ll be pleased to learn that Egypt has even more magnificent pyramids in store for you. Sakkara Pyramids, located only a few kilometres outside of Cairo, provide an insight into ancient Egyptian architectural talent. The breathtaking Sakkara Pyramids, which include the Red Pyramid, Bent Pyramid, and Step Pyramid, stand upright to treat your eyes. Along with the pyramids, there are many ancient tombs with intricately decorated interior walls that will attract your eye.

Luxor Temple

Luxor Temple

Luxor Temple

This massive temple complex differs from other Luxor archaeological relics in that it was constructed as a ritual temple for the crowning of Egypt’s kings, rather than being devoted to a particular pharaoh or deity. It’s a show-stopper, with an avenue of human-headed sphinxes leading up to the entrance, where you’ll be greeted by two broad sandstone towers with carved hieroglyphs and battle scenes. Within, there are colossal deity statues, countless columns and colonnades, and intriguing remains of internal buildings like chapels.

Valley of the Kings

Valley of the Kings

Valley of the Kings

It’s the most evocative ancient Egyptian site, the root of legends about undiscovered tombs brimming with treasure, mummies’ curses, and tomb raiders. Here is Tutankhamun’s tomb, which was uncovered in the 1920s and is still being excavated, explored, and conserved by archaeologists today. It’s a place of scorched desert hills, and you’ll feel millennia consume you whole as you descend into the calm, immaculately preserved tombs, their decorative reliefs looking almost as brilliant as the period they were carved and decorated. It’s a place of scorched desert hills, and you’ll feel millennia swallow you whole as you descend into the cool, immaculately preserved tombs, their decorative reliefs looking almost as bright as the time they were carved.

River Nile

River Nile

River Nile

This almost infinite flow, which runs across 11 African countries from Tanzania to Egypt, was crucial in the development of ancient Egyptian civilization. The desert blooms due to the layers of silt transported downstream and deposited on its shores. Ancient Egyptians were able to farm and sell crops such as wheat, which was a lucrative commodity that contributed to the country’s wealth. It was important spiritually. Both tombs were built west of the Nile because the ancient Egyptians thought the east represented birth and the west, where the sunset, represented death and the afterlife. Sailing on the Nile is one of life’s great bucket-list tick-offs, whether you take a morning boat ride to one of its temples or a leisurely few days’ journeys between Luxor and Aswan.

Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut

Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut

Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut

Established more than 3,000 years ago, this temple emerges from the soaring, jagged cliffs of Deir el-Bahari with a crispness and symmetry that belies its antiquity. Weather, earthquakes, and deliberate demolition largely reduced the temple to rubble in the intervening time. However, a Polish-Egyptian team of archaeologists and conservationists has brought it back to life. Work is still going on, so you can now visit areas of the temple that were formerly off-limits and get a sense of its jaw-dropping architecture and size.

Al-Azhar Mosque

Al-Azhar Mosque

Al-Azhar Mosque

The first to climb into the sky in Cairo, the ‘City of a Thousand Minarets,’ belonged here, as part of Al-Azhar Mosque, the city’s oldest. It is also the world’s second-oldest continuously run university, with a focus on Sunni theology and Sharia law.A guided tour of this architectural masterpiece, complete with intricately painted domes and courtyards, is the perfect way to learn about its origins and ensure you don’t forget any of the extraordinary architectural details.

The Grand Egyptian Museum

The Grand Egyptian Museum

The Grand Egyptian Museum

An imaginative dream came true, and Egypt now owns the world’s largest archaeological museum, which houses the world’s largest collection of ancient Egyptian monuments. It sits on 480,000 square metres (5,200,000 square feet) of land just 2 kilometres west of the Giza Pyramids complex. It cost about a billion dollars to build and houses 150,000 objects, including Tutankamun’s entire collection.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

The Karnak Temples Complex is Egypt’s and perhaps the world’s holiest site. The Ipet-isu “The Most Selected Of Places” and Pr-In “House Of Amon” exhibits the rise, growth, and invention of ancient Egyptian architecture over time, beginning in the middle kingdom (2040-1782 BC) during the reign of Senusret I in the 16th century BC and continuing into the new kingdom in the 17th century BC (1570-1050 BC)The Avenue of the Sphinxes is one of the most well-known features of the complex. It was ancient Egypt’s largest house of worship, with a variety of magnificent decorations, art, and architecture. It was devoted to the worship of the Theban triad, which consisted of the creator god Amun, his wife Mut, goddess of justice and balance, and their son Khnsou, each of whom had their own temple.

Hi, I'm Dhiviya, I'm a content writer and a blogger. I've been writing for the past two years, I write about various topics such as life, crime, health, fitness etc. I believe writing is a journey, we are all constantly learning and getting better every day. I'm more active on quora so you can ping me anytime there, it would be a pleasure to reply to you https://www.quora.com/profile/Dhiviya-B

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